The American Association for Health Education (AAHE)
Information
  • Date submitted: 31 Oct 2011
  • Stakeholder type: Major Group
  • Name: The American Association for Health Education (AAHE)
  • Submission Document: Download
Keywords: Partnership (2 hits),

General Content

a) What are the expectations for the outcome of Rio+20, and what are the concrete proposals in this regard, including views on a possible structure of the Outcome document?

During recent months, citizens around the globe have rallied to challenge practices they view as restricting personal growth and freedom. We value an inclusive process whereby all interested participants have the opportunity to review and comment within a timely manner on draft outcome documents, following the model used during annual UN NGO Conferences.
A possible structure for this document is presentation of main points and responsibilities related to three main audiences, i.e., Member States, Major Groups and UN System, followed by a section emphasizing opportunities for intersectoral collaboration. Contents of the outcome document must connect planned actions to achieve MDGs as related to sustainable development and healthy environments for all persons.
Of particular interest is MDG8: Develop a global Partnership for development. Perhaps it would be useful to emphasize opportunities for active leadership by business/industry, major financial institutions and donors, indigenous people, women and children, and youth, particularly benefitting least developed countries. Which successful international partnerships are models illustrating donor and recipient accountability? (e.g., substantial work by The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, researchers, Member States, and Civil Society to eradicate malaria and polio and develop new models of sustainable agriculture).
There are numerous opportunities for UNmultimedia.org to interface with Member States and their accredited press representatives to disseminate broadly the outcome document to Civil Society and the public in a variety of formats, printed, audio, and digital. The youth delegates will have creative ideas to interface with their peers through social media and other informal networks.

b) What are the comments, if any, on existing proposals: e.g., a green economy roadmap, framework for action, sustainable development goals, a revitalized global partnership for sustainable development, or others?

N/A
c) What are the views on implementation and on how to close the implementation gap, which relevant actors are envisaged as being involved (Governments, specific Major Groups, UN system, IFIs, etc.);

N/A
d) What specific cooperation mechanisms, partnership arrangements or other implementation tools are envisaged and what is the relevant time frame for the proposed decisions to be reached and actions to be implemented?

N/A
Specific Elements
a) Objective of the Conference: To secure renewed political commitment for sustainable development, assessing the progress to date and remaining gaps in the implementation of the outcomes of the major summits on sustainable development and addressing new and emerging challenges.

Contributions could include possible sectoral priorities (e.g., (e.g., energy, food security and sustainable agriculture, technology transfer, water, oceans, sustainable urbanization, sustainable consumption and production, natural disaster preparedness and climate change adaptation, biodiversity, etc.) and sectoral initiatives that contribute to integrate the three pillars of sustainable development could be launched and endorsed at Rio+20.

We encourage ECOSOC, UN Commission on Sustainable Development, UN Forum on Forests, UN Framework Convention on Climate Change, Convention on Biological Diversity, and other conference organizers to provide an historical perspective detailing progress made on sustainable development and environmental protections since the 1972 Stockholm Conference on the Environment. What major barriers remain? What promising practices are likely to overcome these barriers?
Further, we call for clearly articulated and succinct summaries of latest evidence revealing how current development practices lead to adverse effects on the health and wellbeing of all beings. Misleading information not supported by scientific study appears to contradict calls for action to protect our planet issued by Member States and UN Secretary General. Some elected officials have taken a stand opposing sustainable development practices, likely confusing their populace.

b) Green economy in the context of sustainable development and poverty eradication: views regarding how green economy can be a means to achieve sustainable development in its three dimensions, and poverty eradication; what is its potential added value; experience to date, including what has worked and how to build upon success, what are the challenges and opportunities and how to address the challenges and seize opportunities, and possible elements of an agreement in outcome document on a green economy in the context of sustainable development and poverty eradication

What are challenges and successes related to micro-economies, including policies and lending practices supporting small and medium-sized businesses within communities that do not harm the environment and yield jobs with living wages? (e.g., supporting a ?local foods movement?). How does movement toward a green environment contradict large industrial development, which is often supported by taxpayers and governments? What are effects on funding social protections if fewer jobs are created by small and medium-sized businesses? What are known and unknown effects on the health of our planet from development practices that taint air, land and water? Who is responsible to inform the public, pay for and monitor waste mitigation? How may partnerships between large, medium and small businesses be mutually beneficial? How may we diminish trade-restricting rules and practices? These topics seem well suited for panel presentation of multiple viewpoints (public policy, financial institution/investor, industry, small business owner, environmental advocate).
c) Institutional framework for sustainable development: Priorities and proposals for strengthening individual pillars of sustainable development, as well as those for strengthening integration of the three pillars, at multiple levels; local, national, regional and international.

N/A
d) Any proposals for refinement of the two themes. Recall that Resolution 64/236 describes the focus of the Conference: "The focus of the Conference will include the following themes to be discussed and refined during the preparatory process: a green economy in the context of sustainable development and poverty eradication and the institutional framework for sustainable development".

Billions struggle to meet daily needs while unemployed and living in poverty. Poverty eradication is an issue that we strongly support. There is indisputable evidence that public health suffers in populations with limited access to preventive and clinical services. Women and children are disproportionately affected when there are few resources supporting healthy pregnancies, childbirth, child growth and development.
Health promotion activities extend beyond the traditional health care encounter. Aims are ?to achieve the highest attainable standard of health? (WHO Constitution of 1948) by enhancing health-related knowledge, skills and abilities, and ensuring social protections for community residents who are at risk of disease and illness (i.e., very young, older adults, persons with chronic conditions, those living in poverty).
Desirable activities include: (a) teaching healthy habits; (b) providing access to clean and affordable water and sanitation; (c) ensuring food security for all; (d) offering assistance to build safe affordable housing; (e) providing opportunities for daily physical activity and family recreation; (f) ensuring access to essential health care services and medicines; (g) advocating for full employment at fair wages; (h) removing barriers to independence and full participation by persons with disabilities; (i) removing safety hazards from home, school and workplaces; and (j) assisting with disaster preparedness. These activities contradict movement in some Member States to restrict resources to those who can pay for these. We assert that proposed models of sustainable development show promise in improving health of all persons!

Full Submission

American Association for Health Education accredited to DPI/NGO

Inputs for Compilation Document, Rio+20

General Content: Contributions should endeavour to address the following questions:

a. What are the expectations for the outcome of Rio+20, and what are the concrete proposals in this regard, including views on a possible structure of the Outcome document?

Response: During recent months, citizens around the globe have rallied to challenge practices they view as restricting personal growth and freedom. We value an inclusive process whereby all interested participants have the opportunity to review and comment within a timely manner on draft outcome documents, following the model used during annual UN NGO Conferences.

A possible structure for this document is presentation of main points and responsibilities related to three main audiences, i.e., Member States, Major Groups and UN System, followed by a section emphasizing opportunities for intersectoral collaboration. Contents of the outcome document must connect planned actions to achieve MDGs as related to sustainable development and healthy environments for all persons.

Of particular interest is MDG8: Develop a global Partnership for development. Perhaps it would be useful to emphasize opportunities for active leadership by business/industry, major financial institutions and donors, indigenous people, women and children, and youth, particularly benefitting least developed countries. Which successful international partnerships are models illustrating donor and recipient accountability? (e.g., substantial work by The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, researchers, Member States, and Civil Society to eradicate malaria and polio and develop new models of sustainable agriculture).

There are numerous opportunities for UNmultimedia.org to interface with Member States and their accredited press representatives to disseminate broadly the outcome document to Civil Society and the public in a variety of formats, printed, audio, and digital. The youth delegates will have creative ideas to interface with their peers through social media and other informal networks.

Specific Elements:

a. Objective of the Conference: To secure renewed political commitment for sustainable development, assessing the progress to date and remaining gaps in the implementation of the outcomes of the major summits on sustainable development and addressing new and emerging challenges.

Contributions could include possible sectoral priorities (e.g., (e.g., energy, food security and sustainable agriculture, technology transfer, water, oceans, sustainable urbanization, sustainable consumption and production, natural disaster preparedness and climate change adaptation, biodiversity, etc.) and sectoral initiatives that contribute to integrate the three pillars of sustainable development could be launched and endorsed at Rio+20.

Response: We encourage ECOSOC, UN Commission on Sustainable Development, UN Forum on Forests, UN Framework Convention on Climate Change, Convention on Biological Diversity, and other conference organizers to provide an historical perspective detailing progress made on sustainable development and environmental protections since the 1972 Stockholm Conference on the Environment. What major barriers remain? What promising practices are likely to overcome these barriers?

Further, we call for clearly articulated and succinct summaries of latest evidence revealing how current development practices lead to adverse effects on the health and wellbeing of all beings. Misleading information not supported by scientific study appears to contradict calls for action to protect our planet issued by Member States and UN Secretary General. Some elected officials have taken a stand opposing sustainable development practices, likely confusing their populace.

b. Green economy in the context of sustainable development and poverty eradication: views regarding how green economy can be a means to achieve sustainable development in its three dimensions, and poverty eradication; what is its potential added value; experience to date, including what has worked and how to build upon success, what are the challenges and opportunities and how to address the challenges and seize opportunities, and possible elements of an agreement in outcome document on a green economy in the context of sustainable development and poverty eradication

Response: What are challenges and successes related to micro-economies, including policies and lending practices supporting small and medium-sized businesses within communities that do not harm the environment and yield jobs with living wages? (e.g., supporting a ?local foods movement?). How does movement toward a green environment contradict large industrial development, which is often supported by taxpayers and governments? What are effects on funding social protections if fewer jobs are created by small and medium-sized businesses? What are known and unknown effects on the health of our planet from development practices that taint air, land and water? Who is responsible to inform the public, pay for and monitor waste mitigation? How may partnerships between large, medium and small businesses be mutually beneficial? How may we diminish trade-restricting rules and practices? These topics seem well suited for panel presentation of multiple viewpoints (public policy, financial institution/investor, industry, small business owner, environmental advocate).

c. Any proposals for refinement of the two themes. Recall that Resolution 64/236 describes the focus of the Conference: "The focus of the Conference will include the following themes to be discussed and refined during the preparatory process: a green economy in the context of sustainable development and poverty eradication and the institutional framework for sustainable development".

Response: Billions struggle to meet daily needs while unemployed and living in poverty. Poverty eradication is an issue that we strongly support. There is indisputable evidence that public health suffers in populations with limited access to preventive and clinical services. Women and children are disproportionately affected when there are few resources supporting healthy pregnancies, childbirth, child growth and development.

Health promotion activities extend beyond the traditional health care encounter. Aims are ?to achieve the highest attainable standard of health? (WHO Constitution of 1948) by enhancing health-related knowledge, skills and abilities, and ensuring social protections for community residents who are at risk of disease and illness (i.e., very young, older adults, persons with chronic conditions, those living in poverty).

Desirable activities include: (a) teaching healthy habits; (b) providing access to clean and affordable water and sanitation; (c) ensuring food security for all; (d) offering assistance to build safe affordable housing; (e) providing opportunities for daily physical activity and family recreation; (f) ensuring access to essential health care services and medicines; (g) advocating for full employment at fair wages; (h) removing barriers to independence and full participation by persons with disabilities; (i) removing safety hazards from home, school and workplaces; and (j) assisting with disaster preparedness. These activities contradict movement in some Member States to restrict resources to those who can pay for these. We assert that proposed models of sustainable development show promise in improving health of all persons!

Submitted 31Oct-11
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