Inter-Parliamentary Union (IPU)
Information
  • Date submitted: 1 Nov 2011
  • Stakeholder type: United Nations & Other IGOs
  • Name: Inter-Parliamentary Union (IPU)
  • Submission Document: Download
Keywords: Population (1 hits),

Full Submission

INTER-PARLIAMENTARY UNION

THE SECRETARY GENERAL

2012 United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development (Rio+20):  IPU contribution to the first draft outcome document   

Geneva, 31 October 2011   

Distinguished Co Chairs,   

I am writing in response to your call for submissions to the first draft outcome document of next  year?s United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development.    

The IPU contributed to the 1992 Rio Summit and its follow up conference in Johannesburg in  2002.  Overthe   years, the organization has raised awareness in parliaments, organized debates  and adopted resolutions touching on virtually all aspects of the original Agenda 21.  Only last  week, the IPU debated sustainable development issues during the 125 Assembly in Bern,  Switzerland.   

The views that follow draw from those processes as well as submissions received directly from  parliaments in view of the present global consultation. They are organized along the two main  themes of next year?s conference.   

1/ The green economy in the context of sustainable development and poverty eradication:   

- The green economy is a useful concept.   Itcan help propel forward many of the  objectives of sustainable development in an integrated manner. It needs to be  compatible with the larger policy framework that must underpin the sustainable  development agenda for poverty eradication. This includes policies that aim at achieving  full employment, guaranteeing basic rights to health, education and livelihood,  managing Population growth and movements, reducing inequalities, containing stress  on natural resources and preserving the environment.   The document of the Rio+20  Conference should therefore affirm a commitment to these policies as part of the new  green economy paradigm.   

- To  succeed,  green  economy  policy  prescriptions  will  need  to  aim  at  the  dematerialization of the economy, beginning in high consumption developed countries.   A gradual shift is required away from energy/resource intensive material production and  consumption toward education, culture, and leisure activities as equally worthwhile  objectives of human development.  The green economy must be less focused on growth  and pay more attention to redistribution and rationalization of resources and incomes  within countries and globally. The green economy will only succeed if it achieves a  decoupling - on a global scale - of economic growth from environmental impacts.  

- Though requiring a strong national policy framework, the green economy must also be  grounded at the community level through the involvement of local authorities.  National  and local governments must work together to forge a coherent and mutually reinforcing  policy environment.  Urban planning that facilitates public transport, renewable energy  solutions, recycling and reusing by industry and consumers etc. at the local level will be  key components of the green economy in developed and developing countries alike.    

- The green economy must not be confined to developed countries that possess the  required means of implementation. It must be a global phenomenon that includes  developing countries while respecting the key principle of common but differentiated  responsibilities. This will require more and better official aid, technology transfers  through both private and public sector support, and a significant strengthening of the  international legal regime (trade, finance, etc.).   

- The green economy presents a risk of over reliance on technological solutions. While  green technologies and green production methods will have a key role, their application  and overall effect on sustainable development will need to be carefully evaluated to  avoid risks to food security, human health and other social concerns. The positive impact  of green technologies will also greatly depend on an equitable distribution of ownership  rights between developed and developing countries. Key productive assets like land will  need to be carefully managed to avoid excessive concentration in a few large entities.    

2/ The institutional framework for sustainable development:    

- The current global architecture does not sufficiently integrate the three dimensions of  sustainable development across the full spectrum of UN bodies, programmes, agencies,  and international conventions. There is clearly a need for a reordering within the UN  system as well as the UN inter governmental machinery, beginning with the functional  commissions of ECOSOC.    

- The global normative framework for sustainable development should be linked better to  national decision makingprocesses.    Any new UN architecture for sustainable  development should make it possible to include national parliaments in the design and  implementation of global commitments.   Ifa new inter governmental body is created, it  should consider a multi stakeholder format similar (as a basic model) to that of the  Development Cooperation Forum of ECOSOC. Parliaments should be clearly identified in  the outcome document as key to the implementation of all policies for sustainable  development.   

- The Rio conference should provide further impetus to institutional reforms at the  national level. Experience, so far, shows that little progress has been made within  parliaments to mainstream sustainable development. The same applies to the executive  branch where ministries continue to operate in silos without sufficient coordinating  structures. This integration is critical to the design and implementation of sound  national strategies for sustainable development.   

- The Rio conference should encourage all countries (with regard for relative national  capacities) to adopt green budgets. As the key tool of policy making, the budget  document and related processes can be at the center of the institutional and societal  transformation  required  for  the  integration  of  all  three  pillars  of  sustainable  development. At a minimum, green budgets would incorporate from the start a full  valuation of the social and environmental costs of government expenditures as well as a  complete accounting of natural resources and related ecosystem services.   

- An important adjunct to green budgets may be the institution of green GDP  measurements which would reflect the net effect of economic growth on the natural  environment.  To help generate a momentum toward green budgets the UN and related  organizations, could adopt a common global standard and establish capacity building  programs to help member states acquire the required technical capacities.   

The IPU recognizes the importance of the Rio+20 Conference.  It offers a unique opportunity for  the global community to chart a new course for the future of the planet.   Humanity is living  beyond the carrying capacity of the earth while billions of people remain excluded from social  and economic progress.  The political will to adopt necessary reforms is often lacking, with short  term imperatives all too easily trumping long term concerns. Nothing short of a total re think of  the entire incentive system that drives social, economic and environmental development will be  required to set the earth on a more sustainable course.   

The IPU looks forward to the negotiations of the draft outcome document as an opportunity to  further engage with the United Nations on all of these issues.   

I wish you and your colleagues every success with the difficult task ahead.        

  Yours sincerely,   

Anders B. Johnsson   

  CHEMIN DU POMMIER 5 P.O. BOX 330 1218 LE GRAND-SACONNEX / GENEVA (SWITZERLAND)

TEL.: (022) 919 41 50 FAX: (022) 919 41 60 E-MAIL: postbox@mail.ipu.org
Copyright (c) United Nations 2011 | Terms of Use | Privacy Notice | Contact | Site Map | New