El Salvador
Information
  • Date submitted: 15 Nov 2011
  • Stakeholder type: Member State
  • Name: El Salvador
  • Submission Document: Download
Keywords: Science (2 hits),

Full Submission

Translated from Spanish

Permanent Mission of El Salvador to the United Nations

DNU-00235

A. 123

The Permanent Mission of El Salvador to the United Nations presents its compliments to the United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs and refers to its note verbale No. DNU-00232 dated 8 November 2011, in which the Permanent Mission informed the Department that the national synthesis report of El Salvador on the preparatory process for the Rio+20 Conference would be submitted no later than 15 November 2011.

United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs

New York

The Permanent Mission of El Salvador to the United Nations hereby submits the aforementioned report to the Department of Economic and Social Affairs to be used as appropriate.

The Permanent Mission of El Salvador to the United Nations takes this opportunity to convey to the Department of Economic and Social Affairs the assurances of its highest consideration.

New York, 15 November 2011


Republic of El Salvador

National synthesis report of El Salvador: Preparatory process for the Rio+20 Conference

11 November 2011

Contents

I. Introduction

II. Outcome of the Rio+20 consultation workshop

2.1 Principles of sustainable development to be renewed at the Rio+20 Conference

2.2 Strategies, policies and national institutional framework contributing to the achievement of sustainable development goals in El Salvador

2.3 Partnerships contributing to the achievement of sustainable development goals

2.4 Implementation of conventions that contribute to sustainable development

2.5 Progress towards the Millennium Development Goals in the context of sustainable development

2.6 Identifying priorities and challenges for policies and strategies in the context of sustainable development

2.7 Policies and strategies for implementing a green economy in the context of sustainable development and poverty eradication

III. Institutional agreements on sustainable development

IV. Key themes and challenges for sustainable development

Tables

Table 1 Main sustainable development-related national policies, strategies, programmes and plans in El Salvador

Table 2 Progress on implementing sustainable development-related conventions in El Salvador

Table 3 Importance of MDGs for sustainable development

Table 4 Current green economy-related policies and strategies in El Salvador

Table 5 Workshop recommendations for green economy-related policies and strategies in El Salvador


I. Introduction

As part of the national preparatory process for the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development to be held in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, in June 2012 (also known as the Rio+20 process), El Salvador has launched a national participatory process to define a national position on the three objectives of the Conference: making a renewed political commitment to sustainable development, reviewing progress and implementation gaps, and addressing new and emerging challenges. The process will also involve discussing and putting forward national positions on the two themes of the Conference: green economy in the context of sustainable development and poverty eradication, and the institutional framework for sustainable development.

This process is being facilitated by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs (RREE) with the support of the Rio+20 Inter-institutional Technical Team comprising representatives of the following institutions: Ministry of the Environment and Natural Resources (MARN), Technical Secretariat of the Office of the President (STP), Strategic Affairs Secretariat of the Office of the President (SAE), Ministry of Education (MINED), Ministry of Finance (MH), Directorate General for Civil Protection and Disaster Prevention and Mitigation, Ministry of Public Works, Transport, Housing and Urban Development (MOP), Social Investment Fund for Local Development (FISDL), Secretariat on Vulnerability Issues of the Office of the President, Central Reserve Bank (BCR), Social Housing Fund (FSV), Ministry of Economic Affairs(MINEC), Ministry of Agriculture and Animal Husbandry (MAG) and Ministry of Tourism (MITUR). Technical and financial assistance have also been provided by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) and the United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs (DESA).

El Salvador has decided to participate in the national preparatory process for the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development not only in order to meet the United Nations requirements consisting, in principle, of the drafting of a national synthesis report on the outcome of consultations and a national status report, but also in order to prepare a national report on sustainable development that sets out bases of discussion for defining a policy on implementation and ongoing follow-up.

Thus far the process has enjoyed a high level of institutional participation and stakeholders from other sectors have gradually come on board. One of the challenges to be met after submission of the synthesis report is to get the private sector, municipalities and civil society organizations more actively involved so as to ensure that El Salvador has a strong national position at the Rio+20 Conference.

This report is structured in accordance with the guidance from DESA: it begins with a summary of the outcome on the seven themes discussed at the consultation workshop, after which issues relating to the institutional framework for sustainable development are discussed. Lastly, key themes and challenges for sustainable development are identified.

II. Outcome of the Rio+20 consultation workshop

On 27 October 2011, a national consultation workshop to prepare the national synthesis report of El Salvador on the Rio+20 preparatory process was conducted with 58 participants from Government institutions, non-governmental organizations (NGOs), academia, the private sector and civil society.

The results of the diagnostic report on the current status of sustainable development in El Salvador, which had been drafted using information from the relevant institutions, were presented at the workshop. Participants worked in groups in two stages: first they reviewed and assessed progress, the fulfilment of political commitments, and challenges and gaps in sustainable development in El Salvador as perceived by the participants; then they discussed the strategic themes of the conference - the institutional framework for sustainable development and the green economy as a tool for poverty eradication.

It should be noted that, because the outcome set out in this chapter of the report reflects the views and knowledge of the 58 workshop participants, there may be discrepancies in some cases. The outcome of discussions on each topic is presented below.

2.1 Principles of sustainable development to be renewed at the Rio+20 Conference

The 27 principles of sustainable development agreed upon at the 1992 United Nations Conference on Environment and Development were reviewed and the following conclusions were reached:

- The 27 principles remain extremely important and should be renewed as they continue to be applicable for the achievement of sustainable development nationally and internationally.

- Although the principles have not been fully implemented, they should be considered a challenge to be met by El Salvador; it is therefore recommended that they be included and considered in all sustainable development-related policy, strategic and legal instruments in El Salvador.

- These principles should be renewed at the Rio+20 Conference, as people's quality of life must be improved.

- For those principles that are being adhered to, actions, programmes and projects should provide information on them to the public and to institutions whose activities are directly related to sustainable development.

- The general public and institutions whose activities are directly related to sustainable development in El Salvador are insufficiently informed.

- For principle 5, there should be a higher level of commitment and implementation by developed countries for the benefit of poorer States.

- Among the country-level challenges for applying the principles of sustainable development, particular attention should be paid to legal gaps and lack of coordination among institutions. The legal framework should be reviewed and non-compliance should be addressed.

2.2 Strategies, policies and national institutional framework contributing to the achievement of sustainable development goals in El Salvador

Based on many of the international conventions signed and ratified by El Salvador, a variety of strategies, plans and environmental programmes are being developed and implemented in order to institutionalize sustainable development and establish links with different sectors.

El Salvador has a series of policy and strategic instruments that contribute to the achievement of sustainable development goals. The following instruments are directly related to that issue:

Table 1

Main sustainable development-related national policies, strategies, programmes and plans in El Salvador

Policy, strategy, programme or plan

Implementing institutions

Compliance

Gaps

Challenges

Five-year Development Plan

Government of El Salvador

Some segments of the population are unaware of the plan

Weak coordination with financing of the productive sector and cooperation strategies

Lack of inter-institutional coordination

Although the Five-year Plan includes risk management, knowledge about it is lacking

Greater national dissemination of the Plan is needed

National policy and strategy on land use planning and development

MARN

Land Use Planning and Development Act adopted in March 2011 to enter into force in March 2012

There was no consultation on or dissemination of the proposal

The Act should be publicized to raise awareness.

Ensuring that it helps address social, economic and environmental vulnerabilities

National environmental policy and strategy

MARN

There is an environmental policy in place

The consultation process on a new policy proposal is under way

Developing a better strategy to raise awareness and generate input

National policy on air quality

Better dissemination mechanisms

National policy on hazardous materials management

MARN

Special regulations on transporting hazardous materials are in place

Lack of a policy

Cleaner production policy

MINEC

A programme is in place; business owners show little interest in financing the programme

Implementing the programme to achieve cleaner production lines

National climate change policy

MARN

A regional climate change strategy is in place

Carrying out a broad consultation process and developing a plan

National policy on combating desertification and drought

MARN

A national plan is in place

Better dissemination and implementation of the plan

Biodiversity policy and strategy

MARN

A strategy is in place

Lack of coordination, dissemination and implementation

National energy policy

National Energy Council (CNE)

Studies are being done

Investors are being sought

Various projects and capacity-building efforts are under way

Effective implementation

Housing policy

Vice-Ministry of Housing and Urban Development (VMVDU)

Progress is being made in reducing the housing shortage

Strengthening communication between stakeholders and the institutional structure required to take action

Comprehensive export promotion policy and strategy

MINEC

Currently being disseminated and implemented

Allocation of funding

Industrial policy for 2011-2024

MINEC

Programmes such as the Productive Development Fund (FONDEPRO) and production clusters have been established

Large-scale implementation and dissemination

Operational policy on gender equality in development

Salvadorian Institute for the Advancement of Women (ISDEMU)

A gender policy and the Ciudad Mujer programme (providing comprehensive support to women) are in place

Conducting socialization and awareness-raising among the general public

Allocating more resources to the Ciudad Mujer programme

Establishing a strategy to reduce the number of femicides

Overcoming institutional resistance to gender mainstreaming

National tourism plan

MITUR

The 2020 plan includes a comprehensive programme entitled ?Living peoples?

Promotion of conventions with MARN, MAG, UNDP and the Global Environment Trust Fund.

A rural tourism strategy is in place with participation by indigenous communities

Shortage of funding

Does not include an environmental aspect

Public-private partnership projects

Education strategy 2008

MINED

Promoting improved curriculum in technical degrees

Establishment of technological systems

Coordination with FISDL

Temporary Income Aid Programme supporting vocational training

Promoting business training for young people

Shortage of funding

Greater participation by private companies needed

Lack of contingency planning in emergency plans (schools become shelters)

The curriculum should be geared towards different areas of the country

Investment programme for risk reduction

MARN, MOP, MAG, Ministry of the Interior (MIGOB)

Being implemented

Lack of coordination

Improving coordination among levels of government to optimize resource use

Family Farming Plan

MAG

Restricted to guaranteeing food security for the population

Resources have been allocated

Does not include sustainable agriculture

Does not foster organic production

Taking measures to ensure environmental sustainability and prevent soil deterioration

Promoting agro-tourism

Forest policy

MAG

An instrument that captures the needs of the population has been developed with public participation

Has not been formally adopted

Formal adoption of the document

Allocating funding

Irrigation policy

MAG

A proposal has been developed jointly with stakeholders who use water for farm irrigation

Has not been formally adopted

The provisions of the Water Act limit its scope

Pending approval

General conclusions

Although El Salvador has a series of policy, strategic and institutional instruments that contribute to achieving sustainable development goals, there are several challenges to be overcome. Some of the most relevant themes identified in the workshop are set out below.

- Broad consultations should be conducted whenever a policy, plan or strategy is developed in order to incorporate the views of all sectors and of the general public.

- The greatest challenge facing the Government is to implement existing policies and strategies and develop others where necessary.

- The gender issue requires awareness-raising and greater resources for the implementation of projects; in addition, gender should be included in all Government instruments.

- It is very important to coordinate the institutions working on each of the themes and develop the principles in order to improve implementation of measures and avoid duplication of efforts.

- More crucial than developing new policies is taking specific action to implement those policies that have already been developed and approved.

- Debate should be fostered in the private and public sectors to ensure that the question of what kind of country people want and the concept of sustainable development are discussed nationwide.

2.3 Partnerships contributing to the achievement of sustainable development goals

There are different types of partnerships related to sustainable development, whether they be public-private partnerships between the central Government and/or local governments and civil society (including NGOs, businesses, churches and academia), public-public partnerships between the central Government and local governments, and private-private partnerships between civil society entities such as NGOs, businesses and churches. The most relevant partnerships identified by workshop participants are listed below.

The following are examples of partnerships mentioned:

- Cleaner production agreements between the Government and private companies. Three such agreements have been signed with dairy and poultry producers and are being implemented.

- FONDEPRO, a Government-private business partnership, is a fund that provides non-refundable co-financing to micro, small and medium businesses to boost their competitiveness and improve the economy.

- Public-public partnerships: MOP currently has 14 agreements with municipalities for construction projects that will promote municipal development.

- The Gulf of Fonseca Watershed Association(ACUGOLFO) has been established and is operating with the participation of municipalities, communities and NGOs; $70,000 has been under management to strengthen the Committee through the two-State convention of Catholic Relief Services;

- Watershed organizations have been established for the San Lorenzo River in Aguacaliente, Ahuachapán, the Tilapa and Sayate Rivers, which flow into the Cerrón Grande Wetlands Ramsar site in Chalatenango, and the Torola River in Morazán.

- Eight watershed organizations relating to aquatic ecosystems ? rivers, lakes, reservoirs, and the like ? have been established and strengthened.

The following have been identified as priority challenges for partnerships:

- Community public-private partnerships must be given space, validity and priority.

- Different government administrations fail to follow up on sustainable development projects; each new administration wants to impose its own direction and shelves activities already under way, even if these are major initiatives.

- The Government of El Salvador should not allow partnerships that are contrary to collective interests and pose a threat to lives and natural resources.

- The Government should make a commitment to small business development.

- There should be partnerships among institutions, sectors, the central Government and local governments to coordinate activities.

2.4 Implementation of conventions that contribute to sustainable development

The conventions listed below have been signed and ratified by El Salvador and thus constitute the law of the Republic. El Salvador has adopted legislation to implement its national and international commitments.


Table 2

Progress on implementing sustainable development-related conventions in El Salvador

Convention

Implementing institutions

Compliance or progress on implementation

Sustainable development-related gaps

Challenges

Ramsar Convention on Wetlands

Primary:
MARN

Secondary:
MAG, National Civil Police (PNC), Office of the Prosecutor-General (FGR), local governments (environmental units), Lempa River Hydroelectric Commission (CEL), MITUR, RREE

Designation of three Ramsar sites covering 124,800 ha: Laguna del Jocotal, Embase Cerrón Grande and Bahía de Jiquilisco

Three sites pending designation: Complejo de Guija-San Diego la Barra (47,200 ha), Barra de Santiago-Bola de Monte (10,000 ha) and Laguna de Olomega (6,418 ha)

Conducted a national inventory and assessment of wetlands in El Salvador

Implementing an integrated natural resources management plan for the Cerrón Grande Wetlands

Established the Wetlands Committee

Completed an initial study on the economic valuation of the Bahía de la Unión wetlands

Established six local advisory committees (COALs), now functioning

Problem of regulating Ramsar sites and applying regional planning policies to them (adjacent areas are being subdivided)

Sustainable development of Ramsar sites

Sustainable community use of Ramsar site resources

Designation of other sites as Ramsar wetlands of international importance

Convention on Biological Diversity

Primary:
MARN

Secondary:
MAG, PNC, FGR, local governments, MITUR, organizations that administer protected areas (civil society organizations), Customs, RREE

Article 5. Cooperation
El Salvador participated actively in the development of Central American Commission on Environment and Development (CCAD) regional biodiversity management mechanisms, such as the Regional Biodiversity Strategy, the regional Biodiversity Monitoring and Assessment Programme (PROMEBIO), the Strategic Work Programme for Protected Areas (PERTAP), and the Regional Strategic Programme on Connectivity (PERCON)

Article 6.General Measures for Conservation and Sustainable Use
Drafted and approved: national biological diversity strategy and Five-year Plan of Action, national biodiversity inventory and monitoring strategy, national strategy for civil society participation in the management of protected areas, national strategy on capacity-building for access to genetic and biochemical resources, national sea turtle conservation strategy and national avian conservation strategy

Article 7. Identification and Monitoring
Developed the Biodiversity Inventory and Monitoring Manual

Article 8. In-situ Conservation
Established the Protected Areas System and policy

Established the National Node for Invasive Species in El Salvador

Co-management policy for Protected Areas

Updated the list of endangered and near-extinct species of flora and fauna

Adopted the Protected Areas Act

Article 10. Sustainable Use of Components of Biological Diversity
In, 2001, Decree No. 133 amending the Wildlife Conservation Act transferred authority in this area from MAG to MARN to promote effective implementation of the related legal instruments (Environment Act, Wildlife Conservation Act, Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species, Ramsar Convention on Wetlands and Convention on Biological Diversity)

Article 11. Incentive Measures
Completed: Project to promote the conservation of biological diversity in coffee plantations

Ongoing: Establishment of a national payment system for environmental services: the Ecoservices project (in development). Global Environment Facility (GEF) funds obtained for the Project Preparation and Development Facility - Block A (PDF-A) phase of a regional project to involve the private sector in biodiversity conservation.

Article 13. Public Education and Awareness
Included biological diversity in formal and informal/‌non-formal education programmes

Article 14. Impact Assessment and Minimizing Adverse Impacts
Environment Act includes the assessment and mitigation of adverse environmental impact in environmental impact studies

Article 17. Exchange of Information
National Biodiversity Information System created within the MARN environmental information system

Article 26. Reports
Submitted two country reports to the Conference of the Parties:a thematic report on forest ecosystems(1996) and a thematic report on protected areas (2002)

Policy guidelines

National policy on the establishment of the National Biodiversity Information System (see art. 17)

No germplasm bank

Gaps in the system of specialized courts

Absence of environmental education to reduce the indiscriminate use of pesticides

Protecting fragile ecosystems from the effects of climate change

Establishing specialized courts for environmental crimes

Legislation to regulate products harmful to biodiversity

Absence of monitoring for the activities and functions of the Central American Alliance for Sustainable Development (ALIDES)

International Biosafety Protocol

Primary:
MARN

Secondary:
Ministry of Health (MINSAL), MINEC, National Science and Technology Council (CONACYT), MAG, PNC, FGR, local governments, Customs, RREE

Designed the Biosafety Clearing Housing web

page for El Salvador, which is part of the MARN environmental information system

Drafted special regulations on the safe management of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) (decision-making procedures for living modified organisms); pending final approval

Carried out a national programme to build capacity in modern biotechnology and risk analysis for living modified organisms

Proposed a national policy on biotechnology and biosafety

Prepared proposed national policy guidelines on biotechnology

Established a national biosafety framework and procedures for regulating enforcement of the International Biosafety Protocol

Provided training on transgenic products for the National Food Commission (CNA), as well as MAG, MARN, the Ministry of Public Health and Social Assistance (MSPAS) and the Consumer Protection Agency (DPC)

Absence of legislation on chemicals used in biotechnology

Regulatory gaps on imports of GMO-based products

Involving the academic sectors in new technological processes

Developing and implementing appropriate regulatory frameworks

United Nations Convention to Combat Desertifica­tion

Primary:
MARN

Secondary:
MAG, PNC, FGR, local governments, FAO, CRS, RREE

Formed National Consultation Committee comprising government institutions, NGOs and private business

Prepared three national reports on the implementation in El Salvador of the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification

Adopted a national policy on combating desertification

National Programme of Action on Desertification and Drought (PANSAL), 2004

MARN web page with a segment on desertification and drought

Issued a stamp commemorating the International Year of Deserts and Desertification, 2006

Created a Thematic Programme Network on topics including water resource benchmarks and indicators, agro-forestry, traditional knowledge and renewable energy

Established three community rainfall networks

Absence of effective soil salinity control mechanisms for agricultural land

Coordination of institutional contacts for Convention objectives

Encouraging sustainable farming practices by strengthening existing national legislative frameworks and developing the capacity of national institutions to enforce these measures

Reforming the energy sector and encouraging energy conservation and the use of new energy sources

Developing and strengthening technological, scientific and research capabilities

Continuing to work with the other Central American countries to strengthen the country's participation in Conferences of the Parties (COPs)

United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change

Primary:
MARN

Secondary:
MAG, MINSAL, MINEC, MOP, FGR, local governments, RREE

Regional Strategy on Climate Change

Preparation of a national climate change plan

Absence of public policies incorporating the concept of climate change risk reduction

Absence of regional planning policies

Developing a joint regional COP position on climate change to increase negotiating weight

Raising public awareness of responsibility for consumption patterns and reducing consumption

Kyoto Protocol and greenhouse gas mitigation

Primary:
MARN

Secondary:
MAG, MINSAL, MINEC, MOP, FGR, local Governments, RREE

Developed a national procedure for registering projects with the Executive Board of the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM)

MARN has established the Department of Physical and Energy Resource Management (GRFE) under the General Directorate of Natural Resources (DGPN). GRFE has operational responsibility for implementing the CDM in El Salvador.

Established two sectoral technical advisory committees to advise MARN on CDM-related actions and decisions

Updated the small-scale project emission factor for 2005

Conducted a study of the carbon dioxide (CO2) capture potential of forestation and reforestation in the forestry sector, which included the development of a ?Kyoto Lands? map showing the geographic areas with the greatest potential for planting and assisted natural regeneration projects

Adopted an official Salvadorian definition of ?forest? in the CDM context

Prepared a portfolio of 17 energy-sector projects with the potential to participate in the sale of CDM certificates of emission reduction; projects are in different stages of the approval process

Lack of support among developing countries for voluntary efforts to mitigate climate change

Increasing effectiveness in negotiations and convincing developed countries to agree to a second commitment period

Vienna Convention for the Protection of the Ozone Layer, Montreal Protocol

Primary:
MARN

Secondary:
MINEC, Customs, FGR, PNC

Established the MARN Office of Ozone Layer Protection (OPO) for the purpose of complying with Salvadorian commitments under the Protocol on Chlorofluorocarbons

Approved El Salvador Refrigerant Management Plan, Phase I and Phase II

Executive Decree No. 38/2000 on Special Ozone-depleting Substances Control (Quota) Regulations was adopted and its enforcement began through the implementation of a system of environmental licences or permits for the import of chlorofluorocarbons

Various sensitization campaigns on ozone layer problems have been conducted

Although methyl bromide is not imported or used in El Salvador for agricultural soil fumigation, the base level for imports was set at 1.9 tonnes in 1999 (based on the 1995-1998 average), and it has been imported since that time for agricultural use

Lack of effective monitoring to ensure proper disposal of ozone layer-depleting substances (antiquated equipment)

Absence of minimum technology to reduce the adverse environmental impact of processes

Lack of follow-through on punitive proceedings

No regulation of heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems

Certification procedures for companies

Failure to enforce punitive measures

There is a need for an institution to certify companies and authorize individuals with respect to technical standards and final disposal of persistent organic pollutants

Failure to enforce punitive measures

Basel Convention

Primary:
MARN

Secondary:
MINEC, Customs, FGR, MIGOB-Fire Department, MINSAL, RREE, Ministry of Defence (MINDEF)

El Salvador was chosen in 1995 as the site of the Basel Convention Regional Centre for Central America and Mexico. The subregional centre was legally established in 2006 and is currently operational.

The Basel Convention has been incorporated into national law by the Environment Act and the Special Regulations on Hazardous Substances, Residues and Wastes

Our region has adopted the Regional Strategy for the Environmentally Sound Management of Used Lead Acid Batteries in Central America, Colombia, Venezuela and the Caribbean Island States

El Salvador implements Convention procedures with regard to forms, licenses and permits for transboundary movements

Approval and national implementation of the regional strategy for used lead acid batteries

Absence of mechanisms for monitoring maritime boundaries

Effective monitoring mechanisms

Rotterdam Convention

Primary:
MARN

Secondary:
MAG, MINSAL, MH, RREE

El Salvador has banned the use of 37 highly hazardous active ingredients (DDT and chlorinated compounds), all classified as persistent organic pollutants (POPs), and is looking at restricting or prohibiting the use of 21 other chemicals in annex III to the Convention

Application submitted for funding to dispose of obsolete DDT and replace it for the control of malaria

Prohibition of 8 of the 10 pesticides identified as POPs (Executive Agreement No. 151)

Identified chemicals not reported under the prior informed consent procedure (10 compounds)

All highly hazardous pesticides regulated by the Convention are being added to the list of substances regulated by MARN (Agreement No. 40)

Outdated regulatory frameworks

No national capacity to corroborate the risks associated with the use of pesticides

No options available to conventional farmers to replace pesticides

Expanding alternative options for pest control

The Salvadorian position remains pending and must be coordinated with the Ministries of Agriculture and Health

Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants

Primary:
MARN

Secondary:
MAG, MINSAL, MH, RREE

The nine pesticides identified as persistent organic pollutants are prohibited in El Salvador

El Salvador has banned the licensing, import, export, manufacture, marketing, distribution or use as an active pesticide ingredient of 37 hazardous pesticides

Regional action and demonstration programme on sustainable alternatives for controlling malaria without the use of DDT in Mexico and Central America

Situational analysis of DDT and malaria control: pilot project in Sonsonate

Preparation of a preliminary inventory of persistent organic pollutants (polychloride biphenyls (PCBs), pesticides and dioxins/‌furans)

The national implementation plan for the Convention has been finalized, with implementation pending funding

Disposal of 42.7 tonnes of toxaphene

Preparation of national inventories of dioxin and furan releases

Completion of the third national inventory of PCBs

Completion of a national inventory of POP pesticides

Absence of mechanisms for enforcing existing regulations

An institution to certify companies and authorize individuals with respect to technical norms and final disposal of POPs

Convention on Migratory Species

Primary:
MARN, MAG

Secondary:
MAG, Customs, RREE, PNC, FGR

Convention-related legislative framework improved in 2010 (designation of enforcement authorities within the Office of the Prosecutor-General and the National Civil Police)

During the fifteenth meeting of the Conference of the Parties, the Standing Committee validated El Salvador's effort to update its legislative framework by moving it from Category 2 to Category 1, the highest possible classification

Strengthened the Convention permit and certificate system

Developed a draft national policy on wildlife management and implementation of the Convention on Migratory Species in El Salvador

Prepared guides, guidelines and technical procedures defining the roles and mechanisms of action of the institutions and suggesting decision-making mechanisms

Procedures to regulate recreational hunting and wildlife tenure

Biodiversity Inventory and Monitoring Manual

Updated lists of endangered and near-extinct species

Failure to enforce legal frameworks

Absence of punitive measures

Lack of environmental education and awareness programmes

Few opportunities for human development; high poverty levels

Monitoring of points of sale by the competent authorities

Enforcement of legal frameworks

General Conclusions

While the Ministry of the Environment and Natural Resources is El Salvador's reference institution for compliance with most of these commitments, other institutions also play a role.

There continues to be little information available on activities to comply with these conventions. The workshop therefore recommended that the focal point institutions for the conventions should prepare periodic inter-institutional reports on their individual compliance activities, or should report to all State and civil society institutions through a national information network.

2.5 Progress towards the Millennium Development Goals in the context of sustainable development

The Millennium Development Goals are a series of commitments signed by United Nations Member States at the Millennium Summit in New York in 2000. They constitute the first across-the-board commitment among countries to tackle poverty as the major obstacle to human development. The deadline for achieving the MDGs is 2015. They also function to some extent as indicators of sustainable development.

For El Salvador, the MDGs have been an important component of national planning and development, serving as points of reference for the programming and use of significant resources and efforts. From this perspective, they have responded to the country's needs and priorities. The table below analyses each Goal from the perspective of the workshop participants.

Table 3

Importance of MDGs for sustainable development

Millennium Development Goal

Implementing institution(s)

Gaps

Challenges and Recommendations

Goal 1: Eradicate extreme poverty and hunger

STP and the institutions of the Social Affairs Cabinet, in partnership with civil society

No provision made in the calculation or evaluation of the indicator for the impact of natural phenomena

Include other, neglected aspects of poverty

Better instruments for measuring and analysing poverty

Goal 2: Achieve universal primary education

MINED

Include the themes of delinquency and social insecurity

Introducing public information management policies for information on delinquency

Youth social reintegration and employment projects

Goal 3: Promote gender equality and empower women

SIS, in partnership with civil society

Exclusion of women's quality of life and of informal employment as it concerns women

Expanding women's participation in policy decision-making forums

Goal 4: Reduce under-5 mortality

MINSAL

National undernutrition policy does not have sufficient funding

Providing prenatal care and increasing availability

Strengthening food programmes at the national level

Goal 5: Improve maternal health

MINSAL, MINED and SIS

Hospital network should offer better availability

Expanding hospital network capacity in maternal health areas

Goal 6: Combat HIV/AIDS, malaria and other diseases

MINSAL, MARN

Change the concept from ?combat? to ?prevent?

Public education campaign targeting the prevention of these diseases, with budget line allocations for the Ministries of Health and Education

Goal 7: Ensure environmental sustainability

MARN and MAG, with the participation of STP, National Aqueduct and Sewer Administration (ANDA) and FISDL

Indicators do not reflect all aspects and/or sectors of environmental sustainability

Adding indicators relating to climate change

Expanding approach to environmental policies

Goal 8: Develop a global partnership for development

RREE, STP and MINED

Limited computer and Internet access in public schools

Expanding Internet access by means of appropriate infrastructure and modern information technology

Recommend translating global partnership by ?Asociación Global? rather than ?alianza mundial?

General Conclusions

- The participants are aware of the importance of the Millennium Development Goals.

- El Salvador has been working to achieve the proposed targets. In general, progress has been faster in the social areas. Attaining the Goal 7 targets remains a challenge.

- They acknowledge the importance of United Nations support in preparing reports on the MDGs.

- The results of these reports should be more widely disseminated.

2.6 Identifying priorities and challenges for policies and strategies in the context of sustainable development

Looking to 2030, El Salvador's main priorities for accelerating progress towards sustainable development should be developing and implementing population growth policies; establishing a national policy that builds on current efforts, thereby limiting political vulnerability; training human resources in various areas and restoring ecosystems.

The workshop identified the following challenges to sustainable growth over the next 10 years: the need for policies on population growth, climate change vulnerability reduction and adaptation, and comprehensive civil security, as well as the need for community awareness and education on the sustainable management, enjoyment and use of natural resources and for urban development, ecosystem restoration and regional planning.

The workshop's analysis identified the importance of technical assistance to El Salvador from United Nations system entities, which has been a key factor in the progress achieved in the following sustainable development-related areas:

- MDGs: Hacia una estrategia nacional para la atención a la pobreza y el cumplimiento de los ODM (Towards a national strategy for addressing poverty and attaining the MDGs). Agency: UNDP. Partner: STP.

- Agriculture: Support for the development of a long-range Government policy framework for agriculture. Agency: Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO). Partner: MAG

- Vulnerable sectors: Support for promoting and implementing a comprehensive early childhood care policy and strengthening family interaction. Agency: United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF). Partner: MINED

- Health: Improvement of basic social services (emphasis on health, nutrition and HIV/AIDS). Agency: UNICEF. Partner: SIS

- Water: Fortalecimiento de la gobernabilidad y sostenibilidad de los servicios de agua y saneamiento en El Salvador bajo un enfoque de Gestión Integrada del Agua (Strengthening the governance and sustainability of water and sanitation services in El Salvador, with a focus on integrated water management). Agency: UNDP. Partner: STP.

2.7 Policies and strategies for implementing a green economy in the context of sustainable development and poverty eradication

The Salvadorian institutions responsible for formulating sustainable development-related policies and strategies have not yet analysed the green economy in any depth. The challenge of building a national consensus on the subject will require greater coordination and cooperation among institutions in order to achieve a national definition. In this connection, the point of departure is the basic concept of the green economy as the interdependent relationship among the economic model, social development and the environment. There has been no extensive analysis of the benefits and risks associated with the green economy option within the national development model, and therefore there are no specific Government studies on the subject, which remains on the national ?to do? list.

Regarding hoped-for key outcomes of Rio+20 with respect to a green economy in the context of sustainable development and poverty eradication, El Salvador would like to see agreement among all of the developing countries on adopting the green economy concept, with a consensus approach prevailing. It would also like to see the establishment of non-refundable funding mechanisms for all sustainable development and poverty eradication initiatives.

The workshop identified a number of policies, plans and strategies that could contribute to a green economy, as well as recommendations for future policies or strategies.

Table 4

Current green economy-related policies and strategies in El Salvador

Policy or strategy

Implementing institutions

Progress on implementation

Gaps

Challenges

El Salvador conserves energy

MINEC, MARN, Universidad Centroamericana José Simeón Cañas (UCA), Universidad Don Bosco (UDB), the DELSUR electric company, the AES electric company, DPC, CNE, Multisectoral Investment Bank (BMI), Cleaner Production Centre, Salvadorian Industries Association (ASI), Office of the Superintendent of Electricity and Telecommunications (SIGET)

Establishing a single coordinator for energy conservation initiatives

Programme launched recently

Building bridges between the public and private sectors

Cleaner production policy

MARN, MINEC, MINSAL, MAG and private sector

Creating synergies and optimizing resource use between the public and private sectors

Lack of laws on which to base institution agreements

Approval of agreements for the development of laws

?Empresa Renovable? programme

BMI, National Cleaner Production Centre (CNPML), ASI, Foundation for Innovative Technology in Agriculture and Fisheries (FIAGRO), Foundation for the Promotion of Micro and Small Business Competitiveness (CENTROMYPE)

Support for companies to retool for green manufacturing

Companies have trouble obtaining funds

Improving access to funds

Energy policy

MINEC/CNE, MARN, SIGET

Retooling and improvement of the energy system. Encompasses electric power, fossil fuels and the promotion of renewable energy.

Incentives not attractive to investors

Improving incentives to attract investors

Energy and Environment Alliance

MINEC, MARN

Promoting the use of renewable energy in order to improve the energy system

Slow distribution of funds

Slow technology delivery process

Expediting distribution of funds to investors

Table 5

Workshop recommendations for green economy-related policies and strategies in El Salvador

Recommended policy or strategy

Implementing institutions

Objectives or topics

Challenges

Policy on sustainable production and consumption

MARN, CCAD, MINEC, MINSAL, Ministry of Labour and Social Welfare (MINTRAB), MAG, business associations, CNPML

Bring back the green seal-related topics (certification and incentive for businesses)

Improve consumption patterns

Ensure rapid access to funds

Strengthening public-private partnerships

Transforming national production and consumption systems

Improving access to funds

National development policy on promoting green technologies

MARN, MINEC, CONACYT, universities, CEL, CNPML

Establishment of domestic research and development companies in the area of green technologies

Developing green technologies in El Salvador


III. Institutional agreements on sustainable development

Over the past 20 years, El Salvador has sought to develop an institutional framework for the promotion of sustainable development. In May 1997, the Government established the National Council for Sustainable Development in El Salvador, chaired by the Vice-President of the Republic, as a broad-based consultation forum involving key sustainable development stakeholders in El Salvador. However, it has not been possible to obtain up-to-date information from the Council. Although a request had been made through the Ministry of Foreign Affairs for a representative of the Council to join the Rio+20 Inter-institutional Technical Team, no information had been received as of the finalization of this draft report.

The National Environmental Management System has been established and the process of strengthening the environmental units in ministries, autonomous institutions and the main municipalities has begun, in order to ensure that they can fulfil their legal mandates and functions.

In 1997, the Ministry of the Environment and Natural Resources was created to address environmental challenges and regulate the sector. The Environment Act adopted in 1998 introduced major structural changes in public sector institutions, including the establishment of institutional environmental units. Those changes enhanced the environmental management of public institutions and significantly reduced the environmental impact of State projects.

The Ministry of Agriculture and Animal Husbandry, through the General Directorate for the Management of Forests, Watersheds and Irrigation is responsible for the overall development of the productive sector involving forest resources and soil and water resources for agriculture, as legally empowered by the Forestry Act and the Irrigation and Drainage Act, for the benefit of society as a whole.

The management of water resources for agricultural irrigation is governed by the Irrigation and Drainage Act and its regulations to ensure that the resources are used in a rational manner to improve agricultural production and steadily increase food production. It is also governed by the Forestry Act, which regulates the development of forest resources in their multiple functions, including fostering the generation and protection of water sources.

The most important institutional agreement identified during the institutional consultation process for this report is the Five-year Development Plan 2010-2014, which establishes the full range of actions to be undertaken with regard to sustainable development. The Plan was identified as one of the main tools for the development of a process of orderly and safe structural change designed to help build a more just and sharing society and to lay the groundwork for the elaboration of an inclusive and sustainable growth and development model.

A public consultation process is currently under way for the collective development of a national environmental policy, whose major objectives are: (a) to reverse environmental degradation and (b) to reduce vulnerability to climate change.

The first objective reproduces one of the strategic commitments included in the country's Five-year Development Plan, which aims to "reverse the process of environmental degradation and turn El Salvador into an environmentally exemplary country and, consequently, one that is less vulnerable to natural phenomena and human actions". The second objective is based on the growing recognition that the State should take urgent and strategic action to address the challenge of climate change.

The National Development Plan includes the vision, commitments, priorities, objectives and goals of the Government of El Salvador, as well as the environmental and risk reduction policy, which constitutes the Government's framework for action for the current period and includes the following topics:

- Reduction of socio-environmental risks

- Environmental assessment system

- Water and territorial environmental management

- Ecosystems

- Pollution prevention and control

- Comprehensive solid waste management

- Support for local and territorial environmental management

- Climate change

According to the Five-year Plan, at least 12 per cent of public investment would be allocated to sustainable development projects, including energy projects and others related to environmental and risk management, such as the National Risk Management Plan, risk reduction investment programmes (early warning and civil protection commissions), and protection and mitigation projects.

The Civil Protection Directorate has been established within the Ministry of the Interior to coordinate inter-institutional actions for the implementation of contingency plans for the management and control of emergency operations. The Directorate's main objective is to take action before an adverse event occurs, in order to save lives and reduce suffering and losses among Salvadorians, in coordination with the various institutions of the National Civil Protection and Disaster Prevention and Mitigation System.

IV. Key themes and challenges for sustainable development

The following are the themes identified so far during the consultation for the Rio+20 preparatory process by institutions and organizations consulted and workshop participants:

Climate change

- One of the main challenges is to address the various forms of climate change, undoubtedly one of the key obstacles to development efforts and one that requires increased spending and the adjustment of productive systems. Adjustments and adaptations require investments, which in turn call for more resources and financing. Year in and year out, El Salvador grapples with the impacts of extreme phenomena that disrupt regular economic activities and social development, cause losses and damages, and turn into disasters that drain vast amounts of resources and effort.

- The goal of reversing environmental degradation and reducing vulnerability to climate change, as clearly identified during the consultation for the formulation of the national environmental policy, can be achieved through various means, including elaboration of the "Strategic Vision of the Ministry of the Environment and Natural Resources for the period 2009-2014", and development of the key elements identified during the consultation.

- The challenges that might arise over the next decade would be related to climate change, given the high level of vulnerability demonstrated by the natural phenomena that have hit the country. In this connection, the early warning systems and actions for mitigation and adaptation to climate change are being strengthened, especially in agricultural areas, which suffer the greatest economic losses.

- Another challenge involving vulnerable populations concerns El Salvador's marine coastal areas. The first step in addressing this challenge is to adopt a national policy for the sustainable management of marine coastal areas, which would also become an environmental management tool. It is worth noting that the coastal and marine ecosystems are important for the country's social and economic development. As the latest emergency showed, these populations are highly vulnerable and the country suffers significant economic losses. A national policy or strategy might provide a permanent framework for action in those areas of the country.

Institutional framework

- Lack of integration and coordination among the more committed institutions: one of the biggest problems identified is the lack of human and financial resources to strengthen implementation of the principles and objectives of sustainable development. For example, the Ministry of the Environment and Natural Resources has undertaken many programmes to ensure responsible environmental management in the country. However, these programmes and the legal framework do not achieve the desired goal, owing to limited budgetary allocations. There are also few coercive tools and technology for systematically monitoring pollution levels in order to implement the Environment Act.

- The work of the Ministry of the Environment and Natural Resources should be supported by other ministries. As a case in point, soil measurement systems should be used in decision-making and a national reforestation plan should be set up. The legal framework should be supplemented by the adoption of a law on territorial management and development, as well as the Water Act. The Ministry should also be given the legal and budgetary means to establish a system of incentives for reforestation, conservation of the environment and non-pollution.

- The Ministry of the Environment and the Ministry of Economic Affairs wish to continue supporting cleaner-production agreements, since this has allowed specific sectors to improve their environmental performance, competitiveness and community relations.

- To have a positive impact in priority areas, a new strategy for comprehensive intervention has been developed; it contemplates the creation of a new institutional structure to promote the development, redesign and modernization of the existing structure; the deployment of new economic instruments and incentives; and the implementation of macroeconomic and sectoral strategic public policies. Joint action through these instruments will allow for simultaneous intervention in two or more priority areas, which will be a key factor in achieving the objectives and goals of the Five-year Development Plan.

Challenges relating to sustainable development

In accordance with the Five-year Plan, the Economic and Social Council established the following priority areas for the period 2010-2014, which have been fully taken up by the Government of the Republic and are therefore priority areas of the Five-year Development Plan:

- Significant and verifiable reduction of poverty, economic and gender inequality, and social exclusion.

- Effective prevention and combating of delinquency, crime and social and gender-based violence.

- Economic reactivation, including restructuring and modernization of the agricultural and industrial sector, and creation of decent jobs on a massive scale.

- Establishing the foundation for a comprehensive growth and development model; expansion and strengthening of the entrepreneurial base; and reconstitution of the productive fabric.

- Promotion of Central America's political, geostrategic, economic, social and cultural integration.

- Efficient management of environmental risks over the long term, reconstruction of infrastructure, and restoration of the productive and social fabric damaged by the effects of Hurricane Ida and other natural phenomena and human actions.

- Structural and functional reform of the State, consolidation of the democratic regime and strengthening of the rule of law.

- Stronger respect for human rights and fulfilment of commitments to fully compensate war wounded and other victims who still have pending requests with the Government for the damages they incurred.

- Structural and functional reform, deconcentration and decentralization of public administration and implementation of a fiscal pact that ensures sustainable public financing and promotes economic growth, social development and stronger democratic institutional structures.

- Elaboration of State policies and promotion of organized social participation in the public policy formulation process.

Recommendations for strengthening El Salvador's national sustainable development policy

Based on the outcomes of the national consultation workshop and the findings of the report on the diagnosis of the current status of sustainable development and the related obstacles to be overcome, the following recommendations have been formulated:

- A national sustainable development policy that includes adaptation to climate change as one of its key components as well as the principles of sustainable development, social vulnerability and its impact on the economy and infrastructure should be defined or instituted.

- El Salvador should strengthen its cooperation in the regional institutional framework of entities of the Central American Integration System (SICA), such as CCAD, with a view to creating strategic alliances that bolster national initiatives and contribute to the achievement of sustainable development and the establishment of a beneficial position at both the national and the subregional levels.

- The Government and society in general should ensure compliance with all existing policies, strategies and measures, and undertake joint efforts to develop others where necessary.

- A greater focus should be placed on and more resources should be allocated to gender issues in project implementation.

- A national inter-institutional coordination strategy should be established to effectively inform the actions of each institution on topics related to sustainable development and on other topics of national interest, in order to avoid duplication and to better understand Government actions.

- Concrete actions should be taken to ensure compliance with and implementation of the policies, plans or strategies that have been developed and approved with regard to sustainable development.

- Debate should be promoted between private businesses and the social movement on the type of country we want and the policies or strategies that are needed to achieve sustainable development.

- Strategic political support should be provided for initiatives that include a public-public partnership.

- A law should be adopted for the monitoring of sustainable development, since the various administrations have not implemented sustainable development projects because they all seek to impose their own guidelines and impede the initiatives of others, however significant they may be.

- Any existing alliances among institutions, sectors, the federal Government and local governments should be strengthened.

- The development of small businesses should be promoted.

Support for sustainable development through international cooperation

- Actions that contribute to the establishment of a sustainable economy should be supported through non-refundable, low-interest or soft loans.

- Training programmes on various sustainable development themes should be supported at the national level.

- Awareness and education campaigns on the different themes should be conducted.

- Ideas and projects that could have a great impact and that are applicable to our country should be discussed.

- Extensive campaigns that stimulate active citizen participation should be conducted.

From the outcomes of the Rio+20 Conference

- Industrialized countries, which are the biggest greenhouse gas emitters, should make a commitment to reduce the effects of climate change in Central America.

- Central America should participate in the agreements negotiated.

- The United Nations should support the recent effort to create a presidential forum and to develop a regional strategy in Central America.


Annex I

Executive summary of El Salvador's national synthesis report on the preparatory process for Rio+20

El Salvador has decided to participate in the national preparatory process for the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development to be held in June 2012. To that end, it has prepared a national synthesis report following a review and institutional analysis of the current situation and of progress made in the country with regard to sustainable development. We wish to acknowledge the support and guidance provided by UNDP-El Salvador throughout the process.

The national synthesis report was developed in two main stages, starting with the preparation of a report on the current status of sustainable development in El Salvador. During that stage, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs asked member institutions of the Rio+20 Inter-institutional Technical Team to complete the questionnaires developed by the Department of Economic and Social Affairs (DESA). The status report was prepared using the information sent and following a review of the relevant documents identified by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. During the second stage, a national consultation workshop was held, bringing together 58 participants representing governmental and non-governmental institutions, where the findings of the status report were presented and discussions were held on progress made with regard to the objectives and themes of the Rio+20 Conference.

The national synthesis report contains the results obtained thus far from the afore-mentioned processes and should serve as input for the elaboration of the national report on sustainable development. The national synthesis report contains a number of conclusions, including the following:

- It is important to renew the principles of sustainable development adopted at the 1992 conference, recognizing that while they have not yet been implemented, they remain valid and necessary for achieving the current goals of sustainable development.

- While El Salvador has established a significant political and strategic framework for sustainable development, the implementation and effective application of that framework must be strengthened.

- It is important to support and promote alliances among the various levels of government and civil society, in order to make progress towards the goals of sustainable development.

- El Salvador has made progress with regard to the commitments of global conventions related to sustainable development by ratifying all such conventions. However, some implementation challenges remain, including society's lack of familiarity with the level of progress made in respect of that implementation, including in technical areas of government.

- The Millennium Development Goals are important instruments that provide very clear guidelines for the country's sustainable development.

- From an institutional standpoint, El Salvador has made progress in incorporating sustainable development into the plans and programmes of the various State secretariats, including MINEC, MAG and MOP. Nonetheless, MARN is the competent national authority for most conventions relating to sustainable development.

- Although the concept of a green economy in the context of sustainable development and poverty eradication has not been debated extensively in El Salvador, it has been noted that, at the very least, it consists essentially of the interdependent relationship between the economic model, social development and the environment.

Lastly, the report identifies some key themes and challenges, and establishes the need to formulate recommendations for strengthening El Salvador's national sustainable development policy. The principles of sustainable development, the issue of social vulnerability and its impact on the economic model and infrastructure should largely be reflected in the definition, orientation and adoption of a national sustainable development policy that includes adaptation to climate change among its key components.

El Salvador should also cooperate to strengthen the effective development of the regional institutional framework through the entities of SICA, such as CCAD, in order to improve conditions for the search for strategic alliances to strengthen national initiatives that contribute to sustainable development. El Salvador will therefore contribute to the establishment of a stronger position based on its national and subregional experience.


Annex II

Acronyms

ACUGOLFO: Gulf of Fonseca Watershed Association

ALIDES: Central American Alliance for Sustainable Development

ANDA: National Aqueduct and Sewer Administration

ASI: Salvadorian Industries Association

BCR: Central Reserve Bank

BMI: Multisectoral Investment Bank

CCAD: Central American Commission on Environment and Development

CDM: Clean Development Mechanism

CEL: Lempa River Hydroelectric Commission

CENTROMYPE: Foundation for the Promotion of Micro and Small Business Competitiveness

CNA: National Food Commission

CNE: National Energy Council

CNPML: National Cleaner Production Centre

COAL: local advisory committee

CONACYT: National Science and Technology Council

COP: Conference of the Parties

DESA: Department of Economic and Social Affairs

DGPN: General Directorate of Natural Resources

DPC: Consumer Protection Agency

FAO: Food and Agriculture Organization

FGR: Office of the Prosecutor-General

FIAGRO: Foundation for Innovative Technology in Agriculture and Fisheries

FISDL: Social Investment Fund for Local Development

FONDEPRO: Productive Development Fund

FSV: Social Housing Fund

GEF: Global Environment Facility

GMO: genetically modified organism

GRFE: Department of Physical and Energy Resource Management

ISDEMU: Salvadorian Institute for the Advancement of Women

MAG: Ministry of Agriculture and Animal Husbandry

MARN: Ministry of the Environment and Natural Resources

MDG: Millennium Development Goal

MH: Ministry of Finance

MIGOB: Ministry of the Interior

MINEC: Ministry of Economic Affairs

MINED: Ministry of Education

MINSAL: Ministry of Health

MINTRAB: Ministry of Labour and Welfare

MITUR: Ministry of Tourism

MOP: Ministry of Public Works, Transport, Housing and Urban Development

MSPAS: Ministry of Public Health and Social Assistance

NGO: Non-governmental organization

OPO: Office of Ozone Layer Protection

PANSAL: National Programme of Action on Desertification and Drought

PDF: Project Preparation and Development Facility

PERCON: Regional Strategic Programme on Connectivity

PERTAP: Strategic Work Programme for Protected Areas

PNC: National Civil Police

POP: persistent organic pollutant

PROMEBIO: Regional Biodiversity Monitoring and Assessment Programme

RREE: Ministry of Foreign Affairs

SAE: Strategic Affairs Secretariat of the Office of the President

SICA: Central American Integration System

SIGET: Office of the Superintendent of Electricity and Telecommunications

SINAMA: National Environmental Management System

SIS: Secretariat for Social Inclusion of the Office of the President

STP: Technical Secretariat of the Office of the President

UCA: Universidad Centroamericana José Simeón Cañas

UDB: Universidad Don Bosco

UNDP: United Nations Development Programme

UNICEF: United Nations Children's Fund

VMVDU: Vice-Ministry of Housing and Urban Development


Permanent Mission of El Salvador to the United Nations

DNU-00232

A. 000

The Permanent Mission of El Salvador to the United Nations presents its compliments to the United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs, in reference to note verbale No. DNU-00226 dated 27 October 2011 from the Permanent Representative of El Salvador to the United Nations, Mr. Joaquin Maza, addressed to Mr. Sha Zukang, Under-Secretary-General for Economic and Social Affairs, in which he requested an extension for the submission of El Salvador's national report on sustainable development.

United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs

New York

In this connection, the Permanent Mission wishes to inform the Department of Economic and Social Affairs that El Salvador's report will be submitted no later than Tuesday, 15 November 2011.

The Permanent Mission of El Salvador to the United Nations takes this opportunity to convey to the Department of Economic and Social Affairs the assurances of its highest consideration.

New York, 8 November 2011


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